429 Broome St.

NYC 1964 - 1970.

In the fall of 1963 Rosenquist moved his studio from Coenties Slip to the 3rd floor of 429 Broome Street. Although he had incorporated objects and materials into some of his paintings as early as 1961, a number of Rosenquist's works became even more complex and experimental in the new studio. Rosenquist began to utilize materials as diverse as neon, chromed barbed wire, a motorized conveyor with moving belt, and painted plastic. The scale of some works also began to increase in the Coenties Slip studio. Commissioned by architect Philip Johnson for the Johnson-designed New York State Pavilion at the 1964-1965 New York World's Fair, World's Fair Mural (1963-64) measures 20 feet x 20 feet. It was also in the Broome Street studio that Rosenquist painted the first of his four-wall installation paintings F-111 (1964-65). Designed to wrap completely around the front room of the Leo Castelli Gallery at 4 East 77th Street, F-111's overall size is 10 feet x 86 feet. It was also here that Rosenquist produced his major installation works Forest Ranger (1967 and 1968) and Horizon Home Sweet Home (1970).


F-111. 1965.

Red Applause. 1966.
Red Applause. 1966.

Spaghetti. 1964.
Spaghetti. 1964.

Lanai. 1964.
Lanai. 1964.

Volunteer. 1964.
Volunteer. 1964.


Horizon Home Sweet Home. 1970.

 

Rosenquist painted F-111 in fragments because his Broome Street studio was too small for the painting, but the fragmentary conception was appropriate to the picture's politics. "I had begun to think of my life in this society as a joke," Rosenquist explained, "so I thought, 'I'll make a painting that is a joke. I'll use an image of a not yet developed, already obsolete bomber and paint it in fragments.' My plan was to sell the picture in fragments, so that collectors who bought pieces of the picture would be acquiring a souvenir of an object that they had already paid for with their taxes. And if one collector decided to buy the whole picture, it would be a joke, because he would have to be very very rich, so rich that he probably bought a couple of F-111s with his income tax.
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